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Toxic Chips (12/99)

May 27, 2005 RON CHEPESIUK

Henry Drew worked at an East Fishkill, New York, semiconductor plant for 15 years. He remembers how four women workers had miscarriages and that several others complained about a variety of illnesses. One of them was his wife Debbie, who had to undergo two operations to remove brain tumors and remains partially paralyzed from the experiences. Debbie left the computer chip industry in 1989; Henry in 1992.

Drew adamantly believes that the US government should have played a stronger role in monitoring the semiconductor industry in the 1980s to protect worker health and prevent safety problems. "I wrote a letter to OSHA [Occupational Safety and Health and Administration] and never got a reply," Drew said. "I can recall officials from that agency coming to inspect the plant only once or twice. Given the number of people getting sick, you would think that OSHA would have taken a closer look."

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Violence and Trauma (6/99)

May 27, 2005 ANNA MANZO

For peace organizations working in the Balkans, NATO’s bombing wasn’t the conflict resolution they had in mind. Rather, it was the perfect example of why nonviolent conflict resolution efforts need to be more strongly supported by the international community.

As the bombing began, Matthew Rothschild, editor of The Progressive, said, "The thing about Kosovo that people don’t understand is that in the last ten years there was a nonviolent resistance movement … that was one of the most active since the days of Gandhi. And only in part because US and Western governments didn’t support that nonviolent resistance movement did the people of Kosovo … join the Kosovo Liberation Army."

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Latin America: Dangerous Baby Boom (3/99)

May 27, 2005 STEPHANIE BOYD

Carla works nights at a beeper answering service. At 29, like most of Peru’s young people, she doesn’t earn enough money to move out of her mother’s home in a lower-income neighborhood of Lima, the capital city. Without post-secondary training, she has few prospects of finding a good job in the future and her boyfriend can’t find work, but Carla says life could be much worse – she could be struggling to feed, clothe, and raise a child.

When she was just 19 and pregnant, Carla’s mother took her to a doctor who was a friend of the family and known in the community as "safe."

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