Aquilina looks at Nassar during a survivor’s statement. Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images.
Women

Voices of Sexual Assault Survivors Were Amplified by Judge Aquilina

For four days in mid-January, women filled a Michigan courtroom to testify in the hearing of Larry Nassar. An abuser first and doctor second, Nassar ruined the lives of 256 women gymnasts under his medical care, many of whom came forward in court to give testimonies. The testimonies were empowering and tragic. They also highlighted how the outcomes of sexual assault cases often depend on how the judges handle them. In this courtroom, survivors found a rare ally in Judge Rosemarie Aquilina.

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Global News and Analysis

US-Trained Police Are Hunting Down and Arresting Protesters Amid Post-Election Crisis in Honduras

Source: The Intercept

IT WAS THE middle of the night when they broke down the door. The children, aged 3 and 6, and their parents were all fast asleep in their home in Pimienta, a town 18 miles south of San Pedro Sula, in northwestern Honduras.

“They arrived at three in the morning,” said the mother of two whose home was raided. U.S.-trained and supported special forces agents, known as TIGRES, as well as criminal investigation officers searched the family home, flipping over the beds and ripping pillows apart while she and her children watched. Her partner had already been handcuffed and taken outside. read more

Women

Marching Forward: Women, Resistance, and Counter-Power

"I think all of us are involved in struggles that seek to make our society – and ourselves – more human. There are no set formulas for counter-power because we are all different, but we share the unity of moving forward together, in a consistent and interconnected way, for humanity. We can pass on what we have learned to each other, knowing we stand together in a struggle for life, and that our struggles can bring us closer and make us stronger." - Bertha Zúñiga Cáceres, Coordinator of the Civic Council of Popular Indigenous Organizations of Honduras

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Global News and Analysis

Mexico’s Zapatista rebels, 24 years on and defiant in mountain strongholds

Source: The Guardian

The peasant rebels took up arms in 1994, and now number 300,000 in centers with their own doctors, teachers and currency, but rarely answer questions – until now

Diners in the Tierradentro cafe in the southern Mexican town of San Cristóbal de las Casas can choose between a variety of omelettes. The “Liberty” has the most ingredients, the “Democracy” looks the best, but the “Justice” costs the most – possibly because it comes with cheese.

The restaurant is one of many celebrating, or cashing in on, the Zapatistas, the indigenous peasant rights movement from dirt-poor Chiapas state, which took up arms and occupied San Cristóbal on 1 January 1994, the day Mexico signed up to Nafta, the North American free trade agreement. read more